Using stimulus frequency emissions to characterize cochlear function in mice

M. A. Cheatham*, E. D. Katz, K. Charaziak, P. Dallos, J. H. Siegel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAE) were used to assay cochlear function in wildtype and prestin knockin (KI) mice. The latter contain a mutated form of the outer hair cell (OHC) motor protein (V499G/Y501H) with significantly reduced activity. Because several genetic mutations cause accelerated OHC death, it is beneficial to perform experiments in young mice without surgical intervention. Inasmuch as SFOAE thresholds are elevated by only 30 dB in KIs, it is possible to obtain SFOAE tuning functions in these animals. This approach allows sensitivity/frequency selectivity to be assayed within the basilar membane-OHC-tectorial membrane feedback loop, thereby providing information about signal processing prior to inner hair cell stimulation and auditory nerve activation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWhat Fire is in Mine Ears
Subtitle of host publicationProgress in Auditory Biomechanics - Proceedings of the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop
Pages383-388
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 12 2011
Event11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop - What Fire is in Mine Ears: Progress in Auditory Biomechanics - Williamstown, MA, United States
Duration: Jul 16 2011Jul 22 2011

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume1403
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

Other11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop - What Fire is in Mine Ears: Progress in Auditory Biomechanics
CountryUnited States
CityWilliamstown, MA
Period7/16/117/22/11

Keywords

  • cochlear amplifier
  • prestin
  • stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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    Cheatham, M. A., Katz, E. D., Charaziak, K., Dallos, P., & Siegel, J. H. (2011). Using stimulus frequency emissions to characterize cochlear function in mice. In What Fire is in Mine Ears: Progress in Auditory Biomechanics - Proceedings of the 11th International Mechanics of Hearing Workshop (pp. 383-388). (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 1403). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3658115