Vaginal support as determined by levator ani defect status 6 weeks after primary surgery for pelvic organ prolapse

Daniel M. Morgan*, Kindra Larson, Christina Lewicky-Gaupp, Dee E. Fenner, John O.L. Delancey

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate whether major levator ani muscle defects were associated with differences in postoperative vaginal support after primary surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Methods: A retrospective chart review of a subgroup of patients in the Organ Prolapse and Levator (OPAL) study. Of the 247 women recruited into OPAL, 107 underwent surgery for prolapse and were the cohort for the present analysis. Major levator ani defects were diagnosed when more than 50% of the pubovisceral muscle was missing on MRI. Postoperative vaginal support was assessed via POP-quantification system. Postoperative anatomic outcome was analyzed according to levator ani defect status, as determined by MRI. Results: Support of the anterior vaginal wall 2 cm above the hymen occurred among 62% of women with normal levator ani muscles/minor defects and 35% of those with major defects. Support of the anterior wall 1 cm above the hymen occurred among 32% women with normal muscles /minor defects and 59% of those with major defects. Levator ani defects were not associated with differences in postoperative apical/posterior vaginal support. Conclusion: Six weeks after primary surgery for prolapse, women with normal levator ani muscles/minor defects had better anterior vaginal support than those with major levator defects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-144
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume114
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Levator ani muscles
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Surgery
  • Treatment outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Vaginal support as determined by levator ani defect status 6 weeks after primary surgery for pelvic organ prolapse'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this