Validation of Heart Failure-Specific Risk Equations in 1.3 Million Israeli Adults and Usefulness of Combining Ambulatory and Hospitalization Data from a Large Integrated Health Care Organization

Sadiya S. Khan*, Noam Barda, Philip Greenland, Noa Dagan, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, Ran Balicer, Laura J. Rasmussen-Torvik

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Heart failure (HF) prevalence is increasing worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Guidelines emphasize prevention in those at-risk, but HF-specific risk prediction equations developed in United States population-based cohorts lack external validation in large, real-world datasets outside of the United States. The purpose of this study was to assess the model performance of the pooled cohort equations to prevent HF (PCP-HF) within a contemporary electronic health record for 5- and 10-year risk. Using a retrospective cohort study design of Israeli residents between 2008 and 2018 with continuous membership until end of follow-up, HF, or death, we quantified 5- and 10-year estimated risks of HF using the PCP-HF equations, which integrate demographics (age, gender, and race) and risk factors (body mass index, systolic blood pressure, glucose, medication use for hypertension or diabetes, and smoking status). Of 1,394,411 patients included, 56% were women with mean age of 49.6 (SD 13.2) years. Incident HF occurred in 1.2% and 4.5% of participants over 5 and 10 years of follow-up. The PCP-HF model had excellent discrimination for 5- and 10-year predictions of incident HF (C Statistic 0.82 [0.82 to 0.82] and 0.84 [0.84 to 0.84]), respectively. In conclusion, HF-specific risk equations (PCP-HF) accurately predict the risk of incident HF in ambulatory and hospitalized patients using routinely available clinical data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-109
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume168
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Validation of Heart Failure-Specific Risk Equations in 1.3 Million Israeli Adults and Usefulness of Combining Ambulatory and Hospitalization Data from a Large Integrated Health Care Organization'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this