Validation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-57 and -29 item short forms among kidney transplant recipients

Evan Tang, Oladapo Ekundayo, John Devin Peipert, Nathaniel Edwards, Aarushi Bansal, Candice Richardson, Susan J. Bartlett, Doris Howell, Madeline Li, David Cella, Marta Novak, Istvan Mucsi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) aims to address the lack of generalizable and universal measure of patient-reported outcomes to assess health-related quality of life. It has not been validated for patients with chronic kidney disease. We aim to validate the PROMIS-57 and PROMIS-29 questionnaires among kidney transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of stable kidney transplant recipients was recruited. Each participant completed PROMIS-57, a 57-question instrument covering seven domains—physical function, anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, and social functioning—alongside validated legacy questionnaires [Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), General Anxiety Disorder (GAD7), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale revised (ESASr), and Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQoL-36)]. PROMIS-29, a 29-question instrument, is nested within PROMIS-57 and measures the same domains. Structural validity of PROMIS was assessed with confirmatory factor analysis, reported using the Comparative Fit Index (CFI). Construct validity was assessed with known-groups comparisons. Internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach’s α and convergent validity was assessed with Spearman’s Rho. Test–retest reliability was assessed through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: Mean (± SD) age of the 177 participants was 50 (± 17), 57% were male and 55% Caucasian. Internal consistency of each domain was high (Cronbach’s α > 0.88). Confirmatory factor analysis showed good structural validity for most domains (CFI > 0.95, RMSEA < 0.05). Test–retest reliability indicated good agreement (ICC > 0.6). Known-groups comparisons by clinical and socio-demographic differences were found as hypothesized. Conclusions: Our results provide evidence that PROMIS-57 and PROMIS-29 are highly reliable and valid instruments among kidney transplant recipients. We propose it as a valuable tool to assess important domains of the illness experience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-827
Number of pages13
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2019

Fingerprint

Information Systems
Kidney
Statistical Factor Analysis
Quality of Life
Transplant Recipients
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Symptom Assessment
Kidney Diseases
Anxiety Disorders
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Fatigue
Sleep
Anxiety
Demography
Depression
Pain
Health

Keywords

  • Kidney transplant
  • PROMIS
  • PROMIS-29
  • PROMIS-57
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Renal transplant
  • Validation study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Tang, Evan ; Ekundayo, Oladapo ; Peipert, John Devin ; Edwards, Nathaniel ; Bansal, Aarushi ; Richardson, Candice ; Bartlett, Susan J. ; Howell, Doris ; Li, Madeline ; Cella, David ; Novak, Marta ; Mucsi, Istvan. / Validation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-57 and -29 item short forms among kidney transplant recipients. In: Quality of Life Research. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 815-827.
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abstract = "Objective: The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) aims to address the lack of generalizable and universal measure of patient-reported outcomes to assess health-related quality of life. It has not been validated for patients with chronic kidney disease. We aim to validate the PROMIS-57 and PROMIS-29 questionnaires among kidney transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of stable kidney transplant recipients was recruited. Each participant completed PROMIS-57, a 57-question instrument covering seven domains—physical function, anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, and social functioning—alongside validated legacy questionnaires [Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), General Anxiety Disorder (GAD7), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale revised (ESASr), and Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQoL-36)]. PROMIS-29, a 29-question instrument, is nested within PROMIS-57 and measures the same domains. Structural validity of PROMIS was assessed with confirmatory factor analysis, reported using the Comparative Fit Index (CFI). Construct validity was assessed with known-groups comparisons. Internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach’s α and convergent validity was assessed with Spearman’s Rho. Test–retest reliability was assessed through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: Mean (± SD) age of the 177 participants was 50 (± 17), 57{\%} were male and 55{\%} Caucasian. Internal consistency of each domain was high (Cronbach’s α > 0.88). Confirmatory factor analysis showed good structural validity for most domains (CFI > 0.95, RMSEA < 0.05). Test–retest reliability indicated good agreement (ICC > 0.6). Known-groups comparisons by clinical and socio-demographic differences were found as hypothesized. Conclusions: Our results provide evidence that PROMIS-57 and PROMIS-29 are highly reliable and valid instruments among kidney transplant recipients. We propose it as a valuable tool to assess important domains of the illness experience.",
keywords = "Kidney transplant, PROMIS, PROMIS-29, PROMIS-57, Patient-reported outcomes, Renal transplant, Validation study",
author = "Evan Tang and Oladapo Ekundayo and Peipert, {John Devin} and Nathaniel Edwards and Aarushi Bansal and Candice Richardson and Bartlett, {Susan J.} and Doris Howell and Madeline Li and David Cella and Marta Novak and Istvan Mucsi",
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Validation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-57 and -29 item short forms among kidney transplant recipients. / Tang, Evan; Ekundayo, Oladapo; Peipert, John Devin; Edwards, Nathaniel; Bansal, Aarushi; Richardson, Candice; Bartlett, Susan J.; Howell, Doris; Li, Madeline; Cella, David; Novak, Marta; Mucsi, Istvan.

In: Quality of Life Research, Vol. 28, No. 3, 15.03.2019, p. 815-827.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Validation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)-57 and -29 item short forms among kidney transplant recipients

AU - Tang, Evan

AU - Ekundayo, Oladapo

AU - Peipert, John Devin

AU - Edwards, Nathaniel

AU - Bansal, Aarushi

AU - Richardson, Candice

AU - Bartlett, Susan J.

AU - Howell, Doris

AU - Li, Madeline

AU - Cella, David

AU - Novak, Marta

AU - Mucsi, Istvan

PY - 2019/3/15

Y1 - 2019/3/15

N2 - Objective: The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) aims to address the lack of generalizable and universal measure of patient-reported outcomes to assess health-related quality of life. It has not been validated for patients with chronic kidney disease. We aim to validate the PROMIS-57 and PROMIS-29 questionnaires among kidney transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of stable kidney transplant recipients was recruited. Each participant completed PROMIS-57, a 57-question instrument covering seven domains—physical function, anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, and social functioning—alongside validated legacy questionnaires [Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), General Anxiety Disorder (GAD7), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale revised (ESASr), and Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQoL-36)]. PROMIS-29, a 29-question instrument, is nested within PROMIS-57 and measures the same domains. Structural validity of PROMIS was assessed with confirmatory factor analysis, reported using the Comparative Fit Index (CFI). Construct validity was assessed with known-groups comparisons. Internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach’s α and convergent validity was assessed with Spearman’s Rho. Test–retest reliability was assessed through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: Mean (± SD) age of the 177 participants was 50 (± 17), 57% were male and 55% Caucasian. Internal consistency of each domain was high (Cronbach’s α > 0.88). Confirmatory factor analysis showed good structural validity for most domains (CFI > 0.95, RMSEA < 0.05). Test–retest reliability indicated good agreement (ICC > 0.6). Known-groups comparisons by clinical and socio-demographic differences were found as hypothesized. Conclusions: Our results provide evidence that PROMIS-57 and PROMIS-29 are highly reliable and valid instruments among kidney transplant recipients. We propose it as a valuable tool to assess important domains of the illness experience.

AB - Objective: The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) aims to address the lack of generalizable and universal measure of patient-reported outcomes to assess health-related quality of life. It has not been validated for patients with chronic kidney disease. We aim to validate the PROMIS-57 and PROMIS-29 questionnaires among kidney transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of stable kidney transplant recipients was recruited. Each participant completed PROMIS-57, a 57-question instrument covering seven domains—physical function, anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, and social functioning—alongside validated legacy questionnaires [Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), General Anxiety Disorder (GAD7), Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale revised (ESASr), and Kidney Disease Quality of Life (KDQoL-36)]. PROMIS-29, a 29-question instrument, is nested within PROMIS-57 and measures the same domains. Structural validity of PROMIS was assessed with confirmatory factor analysis, reported using the Comparative Fit Index (CFI). Construct validity was assessed with known-groups comparisons. Internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach’s α and convergent validity was assessed with Spearman’s Rho. Test–retest reliability was assessed through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: Mean (± SD) age of the 177 participants was 50 (± 17), 57% were male and 55% Caucasian. Internal consistency of each domain was high (Cronbach’s α > 0.88). Confirmatory factor analysis showed good structural validity for most domains (CFI > 0.95, RMSEA < 0.05). Test–retest reliability indicated good agreement (ICC > 0.6). Known-groups comparisons by clinical and socio-demographic differences were found as hypothesized. Conclusions: Our results provide evidence that PROMIS-57 and PROMIS-29 are highly reliable and valid instruments among kidney transplant recipients. We propose it as a valuable tool to assess important domains of the illness experience.

KW - Kidney transplant

KW - PROMIS

KW - PROMIS-29

KW - PROMIS-57

KW - Patient-reported outcomes

KW - Renal transplant

KW - Validation study

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