Validation of the pediatric infectious diseases society–infectious diseases society of America severity criteria in children with community-acquired pneumonia

Todd Adam Florin*, Cole Brokamp, Rachel Mantyla, Bradley DePaoli, Richard Ruddy, Samir S. Shah, Lilliam Ambroggio

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. The Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS)–Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guideline for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) recommends intensive care unit (ICU) admission or continuous monitoring for children meeting severity criteria. Our objective was to validate these criteria. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study of children aged 3 months–18 years diagnosed with CAP in a pediatric emergency department (ED) from September 2014 through August 2015. Children with chronic conditions and recent ED visits were excluded. The primary predictor was the PIDS–IDSA severity criteria. Outcomes included disposition, and interventions and diagnoses that necessitated hospitalization (ie, need for hospitalization [NFH]). Results. Of 518 children, 56.6% were discharged; 54.3% of discharged patients and 80.8% of those hospitalized for less than 24 hours were classified as severe. Of those admitted, 10.7% did not meet severity criteria; 69.5% met PIDS–IDSA severity criteria. Of those children, 73.1% did not demonstrate NFH. The areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves (AUC) for PIDS–IDSA major criteria were 0.63 and 0.51 for predicting disposition and NFH, respectively. For PIDS–IDSA minor criteria, the AUC was 0.81 and 0.56 for predicting disposition and NFH, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios (LR)+ and LR− of the PIDS–IDSA criteria were 89%, 46%, 1.65, and 0.23 for disposition and 95%, 16%, 1.13, and 0.31 for NFH. Conclusions. More than half of children classified as severe by PIDS–IDSA criteria were not hospitalized. The PIDS–IDSA CAP severity criteria have only fair ability to predict the need for hospitalization. New predictive tools specifically for children are required to improve clinical decision making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)112-119
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Children
  • Emergency medicine
  • Pneumonia
  • Risk stratification
  • Severity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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