Variability in the learning of complex morphophonology

Marc Ettlinger, Ann R. Bradlow, Patrick C.M. Wong*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper explores how theories on the relationship between language and domain-general cognitive capabilities might account for individual variation in second language learning. We investigated the acquisition of a morphophonological grammar paired with standardized tests of memory function. The language learned had simple and complex morphophonological patterns of word formation, which are hypothesized to correlate with standardized measures of procedural and declarative memory, respectively. The results show a significant amount of variation in learning success is accounted for by these measures of memory in accordance with the hypothesis. These findings help explain why some adults are able to learn a second language more easily than others while also advancing a model of second language learning motivated by linguistic theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-831
Number of pages25
JournalApplied Psycholinguistics
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Psychology(all)

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