Visual cliff behavior in undomesticated rodents, land and aquatic turtles, and cats (Panthera)

Aryeh Routtenberg*, Stephen E. Glickman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

3 experiments extend the generality of Walk and Gibson's (1961) research on depth discrimination. The major findings are: (a) Gerbils, spiny mice, and hamsters showed depth discrimination; the 1st 2 species also showed intense exploration on both sides of the cliff surface. (b) Land turtles demonstrated depth discrimination, while aquatic turtles did not, confirming the prior observations of Yerkes (1904). (c) Depth discrimination was exhibited by 8 infant cats, representing 4 species of Panthera. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-146
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1964

Keywords

  • CAT, VISUAL CLIFF BEHAVIOR OF
  • MOUSE, VISUAL CLIFF BEHAVIOR OF
  • PERCEPTION/DEPTH, ON VISUAL CLIFF, CAT, &
  • RODENT
  • RODENTS
  • TURTLE &
  • TURTLES &
  • VISUAL PERCEPTION, VISUAL CLIFF BEHAVIOR, CATS &

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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