Visual images preserve metric spatial information: Evidence from studies of image scanning

Stephen M. Kosslyn*, Thomas M. Ball, Brian J. Reiser

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

555 Scopus citations

Abstract

Four experiments with 61 university students demonstrated that more time is required to scan further distances across visual images, even when the same amount of material falls between the initial focus point and the target. Not only did times systematically increase with distance, but subjectively larger images required more time to scan than did subjectively smaller ones. Finally, when Ss were not asked to base all judgments on examination of their images, the distance between an initial focus point and a target did not affect reaction times. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-60
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1978

Keywords

  • distance between elements of visual image &
  • image size, preservation of metric spatial information assessed by scanning RT, college students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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