Visual loss in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 and optic pathway gliomas: Relation to tumor location by magnetic resonance imaging

Laura J. Balcer*, Grant T. Liu, Gordon Heller, Larissa Bilaniuk, Nicholas J. Volpe, Steven L. Galetta, Patricia T. Molloy, Peter C. Phillips, Anna J. Janss, Sheila Vaughn, Maureen G. Maguire

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: To examine the potential for visual acuity loss, and its relation to extent and location of optic pathway gliomas in a cohort of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 studied with magnetic resonance imaging. METHODS: We reviewed the neuro-ophthalmologic records and brain/orbital magnetic resonance imaging scans for 43 consecutive pediatric patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and optic pathway gliomas who were followed at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The presence of visual loss, defined as abnormal visual acuity for age in one or both eyes, was determined. Optic pathway gliomas were classified by tumor extent and location according to involvement of the optic nerves, chiasm, and postchiasmal structures by magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: Involvement of the optic tracts and other postchiasmal structures at tumor diagnosis was associated with a significantly higher probability of visual acuity loss (P = .048, chi-square test). Visual loss was noted in 20 of 43 patients (47%) at a median age of 4 years; however, three patients developed visual acuity loss for the first time during adolescence. CONCLUSIONS: In pediatric patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 and optic pathway gliomas, the likelihood of visual loss is dependent on the extent and location of the tumor by magnetic resonance imaging and is particularly associated with involvement of postchiasmal structures. Furthermore, older age during childhood (adolescence) does not preclude the occurrence of visual loss. Close follow-up beyond the early childhood years, particularly for those with postchiasmal tumor, is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)442-445
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of ophthalmology
Volume131
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 18 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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    Balcer, L. J., Liu, G. T., Heller, G., Bilaniuk, L., Volpe, N. J., Galetta, S. L., Molloy, P. T., Phillips, P. C., Janss, A. J., Vaughn, S., & Maguire, M. G. (2001). Visual loss in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 and optic pathway gliomas: Relation to tumor location by magnetic resonance imaging. American journal of ophthalmology, 131(4), 442-445. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0002-9394(00)00852-7