Vitamin D status, functional decline, and mortality in peripheral artery disease

Mary M. McDermott*, Kiang Liu, Luigi Ferrucci, Lu Tian, Jack Guralnik, Peter Kopp, Linda Van Horn, Yihua Liao, David Green, Melina Kibbe, Robert Sufit, Lihui Zhao, Michael H. Criqui

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Associations of vitamin D levels with prospectively measured functional decline and mortality in people with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) are unknown. We determined whether lower baseline vitamin D levels are associated with a faster decline in functional performance and higher mortality among people with and without PAD. A total of 658 participants (395 with PAD) underwent baseline measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (DiaSorin radioimmunoassay), a 6-minute walk test, 4-meter walking velocity and the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and were followed annually for up to 4 years. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race, body mass index, comorbidities, the ankle-brachial index, and other confounders. Among participants with PAD, lower baseline vitamin D levels were associated with a faster decline in the 6-minute walk (vitamin D < 30 nmol/L: -70.0 feet/year; vitamin D 30 to < 50 nmol/L: -72.3 feet/year; vitamin D 50 to < 75 nmol/L: -35.5 feet/year; vitamin D 75 to < 120 nmol/L: -35.9 feet/year; p trend=0.012). PAD participants with vitamin D < 30 nmol/L had a faster decline in the SPPB and 6-minute walk compared to those with levels of 50 to < 75 (p=0.034 and p=0.04, respectively). Among participants without PAD, lower vitamin D was associated with a faster decline in the fast 4-meter walking velocity (p trend=0.003). There were no significant associations of baseline vitamin D levels with all-cause or cardiovascular disease mortality in PAD or non-PAD participants. In conclusion, among individuals with and without PAD, low vitamin D status was associated with a faster decline in some measures of functional performance but was not related to mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-26
Number of pages9
JournalVascular Medicine (United Kingdom)
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • exercise
  • intermittent claudication
  • peripheral arterial disease
  • peripheral vascular diseases
  • walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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