Weight loss and reduced body mass index: A critical issue in children with multiorgan chronic graft-versus-host disease

B. Browning, K. Thormann, R. Seshadri, R. Duerst, M. Kletzel, D. A. Jacobsohn*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Weight loss and malnutrition are major problems in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In adults, low body mass index (BMI) is a predictor for mortality; however, weight loss and BMI have not been studied in pediatric chronic GVHD. A retrospective study on 18 children with extensive chronic GVHD was completed. Median age at SCT was 12.3 (range 0.6-23) years; age at chronic GVHD diagnosis was 12.5 (1-23) years. Patients with multiorgan involvement had a mean maximal decrease in BMI of 20.9% and most dropped below 10th percentile in expected weight-for-age. This change in BMI not only indicates a significant decrease in weight but often a plateau in stature. In contrast, patients with one organ system involved had a mean maximal decrease in BMI of 5% and did not fall below 10th percentile. All patients with multiorgan involvement required salvage therapy beyond steroids and CSA. Three patients died due to complications of chronic GVHD. Weight loss and malnutrition (as reflected by a decrease in BMI) are clinically significant issues in children with multisystem chronic GVHD. Weight loss is likely another systemic manifestation of the disease and may contribute, along with other factors such as increased immunosuppression and infection, to increased mortality in this group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-533
Number of pages7
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Chronic GVHD
  • Pediatric
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Weight loss and reduced body mass index: A critical issue in children with multiorgan chronic graft-versus-host disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this