Well-being as a resource for goal reengagement: Evidence from two longitudinal studies.

Claudia M. Haase*, Tal Singer, Rainer K. Silbereisen, Jutta Heckhausen, Carsten Wrosch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

After goal failure, some individuals are able to engage in new, meaningful goals, while others have trouble doing so. Little is known about what predicts individual differences in the capacity to reengage in new goals. Building on affective and motivational science frameworks, the present 2 studies examined the hypothesis that well-being predicts positive changes in goal reengagement capacities. Study 1 was a 2-wave longitudinal study of Canadian young adults attending university. Study 2 was a 3-wave longitudinal study of German young adults transitioning from university into work. Across studies, we examined well-being (i.e., positive affect, satisfaction with life, purpose in life, negative affect [Study 1], depressive symptoms [Study 2]); goal adjustment (i.e., goal reengagement, goal disengagement); and goal-self-concordance (Study 2). Study 1 showed that positive affect, satisfaction with life, and purpose in life predicted increases in goal reengagement capacities. Study 2 replicated these findings and further showed that increases in goal self-concordance mediated these associations. Across studies, well-being (but not negative affect or depressive symptoms) predicted increases in goal reengagement (but not goal disengagement) capacities. Findings remained stable when controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. Together, these studies point to well-being as a resource for adaptive motivational development. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-31
Number of pages11
JournalMotivation Science
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • goal adjustment
  • goal self-concordance
  • well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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