What do we really know about mindfulness and sleep health?

Jason C Ong, Cameron Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Over the past decade, the emergence of mindfulness meditation as a self-regulation practice has led to a substantial body of evidence on the use of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for insomnia and sleep disturbances. This literature has matured with several randomized controlled trials now published and a number of systematic reviews and meta-analyses are recently available. Collectively, there is a general support for the effectiveness of MBIs on self-reported patient outcomes although the quality of studies varies and the findings on objective measures are equivocal. Building upon this literature, further research is needed to examine biological correlates associated with mindfulness practice, whether the timing of meditation practice is related to sleep outcomes, who is likely to succeed with MBI, and the use of technology in the delivery of MBIs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-22
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume34
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2020

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Mindfulness
Sleep
Health
Meditation
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Meta-Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Technology
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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What do we really know about mindfulness and sleep health? / Ong, Jason C; Moore, Cameron.

In: Current Opinion in Psychology, Vol. 34, 01.08.2020, p. 18-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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