What Hath She Wrought?: Woman’s Rights and the Nineteenth-Century Lyceum

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Abstract

Proposing an agenda for future scholarship meshing nineteenth-century popular media and social reform, this essay offers a historical foundation for studies of the relationships between the midcentury lyceum lecture circuit and the organized movement for woman's rights. Although lectures or debates about woman's rights constituted a small proportion of lyceum offerings, advocates considered the lyceum a significant medium for their public advocacy. Conventions of popular, commercial lecturing meant that reformist rhetoric produced in lyceum venues mixed discourses of assimilation and transformation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-213
JournalRhetoric and Public Affairs
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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