What structural length scales can be detected by the spectral variance of a microscope image?

Lusik Cherkezyan, Hariharan Subramanian, Vadim Backman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

A spectroscopic microscope, configured to detect interference spectra of backscattered light in the far zone, quantifies the statistics of refractive-index (RI) distribution via the spectral variance (σ̃2) of the acquired bright-field image. Its sensitivity to subtle structural changes within weakly scattering, label-free media at subdiffraction scales shows great promise in fields from material science to medical diagnostics. We further investigate the length-scale sensitivity of σ ̃ and reveal that, in theory, it can detect RI fluctuations at any spatial frequency whatsoever. Based on a 5% noise floor, σ ̃ detects scales from ∼22 to 200-700 nm (exact values depend on sample structure and thickness). In an example involving mass-density distribution characteristic of biological cell nuclei, we suggest the level of chromatin organization, which can be quantified via σ ̃.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4290-4293
Number of pages4
JournalOptics Letters
Volume39
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

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