When domestic politics and international relations intermesh: Subordinated publics' factional support within layered power structures

Felicia Pratto, Jim Sidanius, Fouad Bou Zeineddine, Nour Kteily, Shana Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using social dominance theory and structural balance theory to analyze the political and psychological perspectives of subordinated peoples, we argue that struggles between dominant and subordinated polities are embedded in layered power structures. In such contexts, it is important to examine publics' political desires and interests in relation to their political elites' positions or choices of political tactics and allegiances. To illustrate these arguments, we used random urban samples surveyed in March 2010 to examine Lebanese and Syrian citizens' favorability toward their governments and Hezbollah (a quasi-government faction with significant relations to the governments of Iran, Syria, Lebanon, and the United States). As theorized, citizens' favorability depended on (i) how much they view their government as providing services for them, (ii) opposition to general group dominance, (iii) opposition to US oppression, and (iv) their governments' alignments vis-à-vis the US. Implications for political psychology and international relations theory are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-148
Number of pages22
JournalForeign Policy Analysis
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations

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