‘When I die, let me be the last.’ Community health worker perspectives on past Ebola and Marburg outbreaks in Uganda

Ethan Graham Englert*, Rose Kiwanuka, Leah C. Neubauer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Uganda suffered four Ebola and five Marburg virus outbreaks from 2000 to 2012 with significant health worker mortality. This paper describes findings from 41 interviews with health workers from three outbreaks. Interviewees frequently encountered stigma from their communities, sometimes accompanied by mistrust and violence. These difficulties were defined as ‘challenges of society.’ Health workers also suffered emotional trauma, depressive symptoms, and fear classified as ‘challenges of psyche.’ As the incidence of such outbreaks will likely increase due to ecological and economic trends, health workers require greater access to personal protective equipment (PPE) and knowledge of viral containment. Such improvements would create an optimal psychosocial climate for managing infectious patients ultimately decreasing the severity of future outbreaks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1182-1192
Number of pages11
JournalGlobal Public Health
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2019

Keywords

  • Ebola virus
  • Marburg virus
  • Uganda
  • health worker
  • psychosocial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '‘When I die, let me be the last.’ Community health worker perspectives on past Ebola and Marburg outbreaks in Uganda'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this