“When We Come to Your Class … We Feel Not Like We're in Prison”: Resisting Prison-School’s Dehumanizing and (De)Socializing Mechanisms Through Abolitionist Praxis

Subini A. Annamma, Brian Cabral*, Brianna Harvey, Jennifer M. Wilmot, Annie Le, Jamelia Morgan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Education research increasingly conceptualizes how social interactions and contexts of public schools replicate practices found in prisons. Yet prison-schooling is often left out of education research. Concurrently, prison-schooling is where we educate a disproportionate amount of multiply marginalized youth, specifically disabled Girls of Color. The lack of attention to prison-schools has limited how teaching in youth carceral facilities can be examined for its challenges and supports of disabled Girls of Color. Centering the girls’ words from class observations, field notes, and interviews, this study describes and intervenes in dehumanizing and (de)socializing mechanisms in prison-school education. We explore attempts and impacts of countering prison-school education through a sociocritical literacy course infused with an abolitionist praxis. We end with discussion on the limits of countering prison-school through courses alone, suggesting abolition across multiple scales instead.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-47
Number of pages45
JournalAmerican Educational Research Journal
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2024

Keywords

  • abolition
  • carceral studies
  • disability critical race theory
  • gender
  • race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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