White matter tract damage in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal and corticobasal dementia syndromes

Fernanda Tovar-Moll, Ricardo De Oliveira-Souza, Ivanei Edson Bramati, Roland Zahn, Alyson Cavanagh, Michael Tierney, Jorge Moll, Jordan Henry Grafman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The phenotypes of the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and the corticobasal syndrome present considerable clinical and anatomical overlap. The respective patterns of white matter damage in these syndromes have not been directly contrasted. Beyond cortical involvement, damage to white matter pathways may critically contribute to both common and specific symptoms in both conditions. Here we assessed patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and corticobasal syndrome with whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging to identify the white matter networks underlying these pathologies. Twenty patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia, 19 with corticobasal syndrome, and 15 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Differences in tract integrity between (i) patients and controls, and (ii) patients with the corticobasal syndrome and the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia were assessed with whole brain tract-based spatial statistics and analyses of regions of interest. Behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and the corticobasal syndrome shared a pattern of bilaterally decreased white matter integrity in the anterior commissure, genu and body of the corpus callosum, corona radiata and in the long intrahemispheric association pathways. Patients with the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia showed greater damage to the uncinate fasciculus, genu of corpus callosum and forceps minor. In contrast, corticobasal syndrome patients had greater damage to the midbody of the corpus callosum and perirolandic corona radiata. Whereas several compact white matter pathways were damaged in both the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia and corticobasal syndrome, the distribution and degree of white matter damage differed between them. These findings concur with the distinctive clinical manifestations of these conditions and may improve the in vivo neuroanatomical and diagnostic characterization of these disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere102656
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 23 2014

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Frontotemporal Dementia
dementia
Brain
Diffusion tensor imaging
Pathology
Corpus Callosum
Statistics
brain
Spatial Analysis
Diffusion Tensor Imaging
White Matter
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Surgical Instruments
statistics
image analysis
phenotype
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Tovar-Moll, F., De Oliveira-Souza, R., Bramati, I. E., Zahn, R., Cavanagh, A., Tierney, M., ... Grafman, J. H. (2014). White matter tract damage in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal and corticobasal dementia syndromes. PloS one, 9(7), [e102656]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102656
Tovar-Moll, Fernanda ; De Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo ; Bramati, Ivanei Edson ; Zahn, Roland ; Cavanagh, Alyson ; Tierney, Michael ; Moll, Jorge ; Grafman, Jordan Henry. / White matter tract damage in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal and corticobasal dementia syndromes. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 7.
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Tovar-Moll, F, De Oliveira-Souza, R, Bramati, IE, Zahn, R, Cavanagh, A, Tierney, M, Moll, J & Grafman, JH 2014, 'White matter tract damage in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal and corticobasal dementia syndromes', PloS one, vol. 9, no. 7, e102656. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102656

White matter tract damage in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal and corticobasal dementia syndromes. / Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; De Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo; Bramati, Ivanei Edson; Zahn, Roland; Cavanagh, Alyson; Tierney, Michael; Moll, Jorge; Grafman, Jordan Henry.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 7, e102656, 23.07.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Tovar-Moll F, De Oliveira-Souza R, Bramati IE, Zahn R, Cavanagh A, Tierney M et al. White matter tract damage in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal and corticobasal dementia syndromes. PloS one. 2014 Jul 23;9(7). e102656. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102656