Who teaches residents about the prevention and treatment of substance use disorders? A national survey

Michael F. Fleming*, Linda Baier Manwell, Mark Kraus, J. Harry Isaacson, Ruth Kahn, Ellyn A. Stauffacher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Studies indicate that physicians are poorly prepared to identify and treat tobacco, alcohol, and drug use disorders. Several faculty development programs have been created to increase the number of residency teaching faculty with expertise in this area. There is limited information, however, on those who currently teach residents about these problems and whether there is a need for additional faculty development programs. METHODS. We conducted a 2-stage national survey of faculty who teach residents about substance use problems. First, residency directors from 7 specialties (family medicine, psychiatry, internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, emergency medicine, and osteopathy) responded to a mailed questionnaire asking them to identify faculty who teach residents about substance use disorders. Second, those identified were contacted and asked to participate in a telephone interview. RESULTS. Of 1293 faculty identified by the residency directors, 769 participated in a research interview. Most of these teachers were full-time physician faculty, men, white, and based in departments of family medicine or psychiatry. Teaching was primarily conducted in hospitals, general outpatient clinics, and classrooms rather than alcohol and drug treatment programs. Less than 10% of the faculty performed clinical work in alcohol and drug treatment programs, and only 19% were certified addiction specialists. The respondents reported a definite need for additional development programs for themselves and other residency teaching faculty. CONCLUSIONS. We suggest a modest increase in the number of faculty who teach residents about substance abuse disorders, and the creation of additional faculty development programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)725-729
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Family Practice
Volume48
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 1999

Keywords

  • Faculty
  • Schools, medical
  • Substance use disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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