Whose video? Surveying implications for participants’ engagement in video recording practices in ethnographic research

Colin Hennessy Elliott, Sarah Radke, David DeLiema, Deborah Silvis, Lauren Vogelstein, Rogers Hall, Shirin Vossoughi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This symposium builds on the argument for viewing video recording as theory (Hall, 2000) by focusing on instances when participants intentionally engage with ongoing recording, move/interact with recording equipment, and (re)purpose video records. All four papers use example interactions to highlight how participants reorient data collection and use, reorganizing control over how their stories are recorded, shared, and analyzed in the future; we argue that these moves are attempts to further relationship building, countering the surveillance technologies cameras have become (Vossoughi & Escude, 2016). We discuss the methodological implications for future research, asking video recording as whose theory?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Subtitle of host publicationThe Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Conference Proceedings
EditorsMelissa Gresalfi, Ilana Seidel Horn
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages414-421
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9781732467255
StatePublished - 2020
Event14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020 - Nashville, United States
Duration: Jun 19 2020Jun 23 2020

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Conference

Conference14th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Interdisciplinarity of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2020
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityNashville
Period6/19/206/23/20

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

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