Why Physicians Don't Ask

Monisha Arya, Sajani Patel, Disha Kumar*, Micha Yin Zheng, Michael A. Kallen, Richard L. Street, Kasisomayajula Viswanath, Thomas P. Giordano

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

In 2006, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended HIV testing for all adolescents and adults aged 13 to 64 in health care settings with a HIV prevalence of at least 0.1%. However, 55% of US adults have never been tested and therefore do not know their HIV status. To understand suboptimal HIV testing rates, this study sought to illuminate interpersonal and intrapersonal physician barriers to HIV testing. One hundred and eighty physicians from health centers in Houston completed a survey based on Cabana's Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors model. One-third of the physicians faced at least 1 interpersonal barrier to HIV testing, such as a difference in age or language. Many (41%) physicians faced at least 1 intrapersonal barrier, such as believing their patients would be feeling uncomfortable discussing HIV. Notably, 71% of physicians would prefer their patients ask for the test. A patient-engaging campaign may be an innovative solution to increasing HIV testing and reducing the number of undiagnosed persons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)306-312
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Keywords

  • HIV testing
  • patient-centered campaign
  • patient-physician communication
  • physician barriers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Arya, M., Patel, S., Kumar, D., Zheng, M. Y., Kallen, M. A., Street, R. L., Viswanath, K., & Giordano, T. P. (2016). Why Physicians Don't Ask. Journal of the International Association of Providers of AIDS Care, 15(4), 306-312. https://doi.org/10.1177/2325957414557268