Why teleworkers are more satisfied with their jobs than are office-based workers: When less contact is beneficial

Kathryn L. Fonner, Michael E. Roloff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

87 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study challenges assumptions regarding the value and necessity of frequent face-to-face workplace interaction by building upon a theoretical framework for the consequences of telecommuting. Using a multiple mediation approach and path analysis, the study examines the extent to which telework affects job satisfaction through the experiences of work-life conflict, stress due to meetings and interruptions, perceived organizational politics, and information exchange. Results reveal that high-intensity teleworkers (n = 89) are more satisfied than office-based employees (n = 103) and achieve significant benefits from their work arrangement, with work-life conflict most influential toward job satisfaction. The path model reveals more complex indirect paths linking telework and job satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-361
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Applied Communication Research
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 13 2010

Keywords

  • Job satisfaction
  • Meetings
  • Organizational politics
  • Telework
  • Work-life conflict

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

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