Will the disadvantaged ride the information highway? Hopeful answers from a computer-based health crisis system

Suzanne Pingree*, Robert P. Hawkins, David H. Gustafson, Eric Boberg, Earl Bricker, Meg Wise, Haile Berhe, Elsa Hsu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

While much research on new communication technologies has warned that disadvantaged groups will make less use of empowering information, doing anything about it will require distinguishing between explanations. Lack of access is largely an economic and policy issue, while explanations based on lack of skills, motivation or information-oriented media habits locate much of the problem with individuals. The research reported here provided access to a technology-based system, and indicates that the other barriers can be overcome. An interactive computer system (CHESS - Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System) was placed in homes of HIV-infected people, and use was monitored by the computer. While the system was used heavily over several months, differences between demographic subgroups were small, and in most cases the system was used more by groups ordinarily expected to use these technologies less. Thus, while economic barriers to access certainly exist, a case for subsidizing access to overcome those barriers can be made.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-353
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Will the disadvantaged ride the information highway? Hopeful answers from a computer-based health crisis system'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this