Willingness to Donate Hair Samples for Research among People Living with HIV/AIDS Attending a Tertiary Health Facility in Ibadan, Nigeria

Jacinta N. Nwogu*, Chinedum P. Babalola, Samuel O. Ngene, Babafemi O. Taiwo, Baiba Berzins, Monica Gandhi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The use of hair samples in biomedical research is a rapidly growing field. High acceptability rates for hair collection have been demonstrated in multiple settings. Each setting may have unique issues and, to our knowledge, no previous study has assessed the acceptability of hair sampling for HIV-related research in Nigeria. This study aimed to assess the willingness to donate hair for research among people living with HIV (PLWH). A cross-sectional study was conducted among 381 PLWH in a tertiary institution in Southwest Nigeria, using convenience sampling. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from consenting participants, including a question on willingness to donate hair for research. The mean age of respondents was 42.1 ± 10.5 years and more than three-quarters of the respondents were females. Two hundred and eighty-eight (75.8%) respondents had at least a tertiary education. Only 51.4% of the respondents were willing to donate their hair for research. Possible sample diversion for rituals was the major (60.5%) reason cited for unwillingness to donate hair. In multivariate analysis, respondents with primary education or less exhibited a trend toward being more willing to donate hair than those with secondary education or more (p = .091). Muslims were 1.7 times more willing to donate hair than Christians even after adjusting for other demographic covariates (95% confidence interval: 1.11-2.72); p = .016. There is a moderate willingness to donate hair for research among our population of PLWH in Nigeria. These results underscore the importance of cultural sensitivity and community education when introducing innovative HIV research techniques to new settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-648
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS research and human retroviruses
Volume35
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019

Keywords

  • HIV
  • acceptability rate
  • adherence monitoring
  • antiretroviral drugs
  • beliefs
  • biomedical research
  • hair collection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Willingness to Donate Hair Samples for Research among People Living with HIV/AIDS Attending a Tertiary Health Facility in Ibadan, Nigeria'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this