Winning the Hearts and Minds of Police Officers: An Assessment of Staff Perceptions of Community Policing in Chicago

Arthur J. Lurigio*, Wesley G. Skogan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

125 Scopus citations

Abstract

The success of community policing depends on the police officers who are responsible for implementing the programs. In essence, their attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors must be substantially changed before community policing can be put into practice. Chicago's community policing program, known as CAPS, became operational in March 1993 in five prototype districts. Before the program strated, officers were surveyed about their job satisfaction, their supervisors, and their opinions regarding community policing. Results showed that officers were very ambivalent about CAPS. They were supportive of some CAPS-related activities (e.g., solving noncrime problems), but not others (e.g., foot patrol), and were dubious about the program's effects on crime and neighborhood relations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-330
Number of pages16
JournalCrime & Delinquency
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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