Wireless motility capsule test in children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms

Alex D. Green, Jaime Belkind-Gerson, Brian C. Surjanhata, Hayat Mousa, Braden Kuo, Carlo Di Lorenzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To compare scintigraphic gastric emptying and antroduodenal manometry (ADM) studies with the wireless motility capsule test in symptomatic pediatric patients. Study design Patients aged 8-17 years with severe upper gastrointestinal symptoms (ie, nausea, vomiting, retching, abdominal pain) referred for ADM were recruited. A standardized protocol for ADM was used. On a different day, participants were given a standardized meal and then swallowed the wireless motility capsule. A wireless receiver unit worn during the study recorded transmitted data. If not performed previously, a 2-hour scintigraphic gastric emptying study was completed at the time of ADM testing. Results A total of 22 patients were recruited, of whom 21 had complete scintigraphic gastric emptying study data and 20 had complete ADM data. The wireless motility capsule test had 100% sensitivity and 50% specificity in detecting gastroparesis compared with the 2-hour scintigraphic gastric emptying study. The wireless motility capsule test detected motor abnormalities in 17 patients, compared with 10 detected by ADM. Dichotomous comparison yielded a diagnostic difference between ADMand the wireless motility capsule test (P < .01). Migrating motor complexes were recognized in all patients by both ADMand the wireless motility capsule test. The wireless motility capsule test was well tolerated in all patients, and there were no side effects. Conclusion In symptomatic pediatric patients, the wireless motility capsule test is highly sensitive compared with scintigraphic gastric emptying studies in detecting gastroparesis, and seems to be more sensitive than ADM in detecting motor abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1181-1187
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume162
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Manometry
Capsules
Gastric Emptying
Gastroparesis
Migrating Myoelectric Complexes
Pediatrics
Nausea
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting
Meals
Sensitivity and Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Green, A. D., Belkind-Gerson, J., Surjanhata, B. C., Mousa, H., Kuo, B., & Di Lorenzo, C. (2013). Wireless motility capsule test in children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Journal of Pediatrics, 162(6), 1181-1187. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.11.040
Green, Alex D. ; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime ; Surjanhata, Brian C. ; Mousa, Hayat ; Kuo, Braden ; Di Lorenzo, Carlo. / Wireless motility capsule test in children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2013 ; Vol. 162, No. 6. pp. 1181-1187.
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Green, AD, Belkind-Gerson, J, Surjanhata, BC, Mousa, H, Kuo, B & Di Lorenzo, C 2013, 'Wireless motility capsule test in children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 162, no. 6, pp. 1181-1187. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2012.11.040

Wireless motility capsule test in children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. / Green, Alex D.; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Surjanhata, Brian C.; Mousa, Hayat; Kuo, Braden; Di Lorenzo, Carlo.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 162, No. 6, 01.01.2013, p. 1181-1187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Surjanhata, Brian C.

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N2 - Objective To compare scintigraphic gastric emptying and antroduodenal manometry (ADM) studies with the wireless motility capsule test in symptomatic pediatric patients. Study design Patients aged 8-17 years with severe upper gastrointestinal symptoms (ie, nausea, vomiting, retching, abdominal pain) referred for ADM were recruited. A standardized protocol for ADM was used. On a different day, participants were given a standardized meal and then swallowed the wireless motility capsule. A wireless receiver unit worn during the study recorded transmitted data. If not performed previously, a 2-hour scintigraphic gastric emptying study was completed at the time of ADM testing. Results A total of 22 patients were recruited, of whom 21 had complete scintigraphic gastric emptying study data and 20 had complete ADM data. The wireless motility capsule test had 100% sensitivity and 50% specificity in detecting gastroparesis compared with the 2-hour scintigraphic gastric emptying study. The wireless motility capsule test detected motor abnormalities in 17 patients, compared with 10 detected by ADM. Dichotomous comparison yielded a diagnostic difference between ADMand the wireless motility capsule test (P < .01). Migrating motor complexes were recognized in all patients by both ADMand the wireless motility capsule test. The wireless motility capsule test was well tolerated in all patients, and there were no side effects. Conclusion In symptomatic pediatric patients, the wireless motility capsule test is highly sensitive compared with scintigraphic gastric emptying studies in detecting gastroparesis, and seems to be more sensitive than ADM in detecting motor abnormalities.

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