Words mean things: How museum workers’ discursive practices position the diverse communities they seek to engage

Krystal Villanosa, Michael Horn

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

How do museum workers, particularly those in science and technology centers and museums, conceptualize racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity? What might the language they use (e.g. “low-income,” “non-English speaking families”) to describe racially, ethnically, and culturally diverse communities reveal about how museum workers position persons and groups from these communities? In this paper, we present our preliminary findings from an interview study with science museum workers regarding their beliefs about diversity. In doing so, we offer insights about the racialized narratives embedded in discourses about diversity and diverse communities and discuss the potential implications of their use for learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1053-1056
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS
Volume2
Issue number2018-June
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2018: Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count - London, United Kingdom
Duration: Jun 23 2018Jun 27 2018

Keywords

  • Discourse
  • Diversity
  • Equity
  • Museums
  • Positioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education

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