Working through: In-session processes that promote between-session thoughts and activities

Jesse Owen*, Kelley Quirk, Mark J. Hilsenroth, Emil Rodolfa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined whether clients' ratings of the working alliance as well as their perception of cognitive-behavioral (CB) and psychodynamic-interpersonal (PI) techniques (delivered by therapists who used both) were associated with clients' intersession processes (i.e., their thoughts about therapy and therapeutic activity between sessions). Seventy-five clients who were currently in therapy at a large university counseling center participated in thecurrent study. Multilevel regression analyses demonstrated that alliance and clients' perceptions of their therapists' use of PI techniques were positively associated with clients' general thoughts about therapy between sessions. Also, stronger alliances were associated with more therapeutic activities between sessions and more positive (and less negative) thoughts about therapy between sessions. In addition, clients at later sessions who described their therapists as using more PI techniques also reported engaging in more therapeutic activities between sessions (after controlling for the variance in the other variables, such as use of CB techniques). Clients' perceptions of their therapists' use of CB techniques in the most recent session were not related to thinking about therapy or therapeutic activities after controlling for the variance in the other variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-167
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Keywords

  • Alliance
  • Cognitive-behavioral
  • Intersession processes
  • Psychodynamic
  • Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Working through: In-session processes that promote between-session thoughts and activities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this