'Yes, I Am More than Just That': Gay/Bisexual Young Men Residing in the United States Discuss the Influence of Minority Stress on their Sexual Risk Behavior Prior to Hiv Infection

Marco A. Hidalgo, Christopher Cotten, Amy K. Johnson, Lisa M. Kuhns, Robert Garofalo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rates of HIV infection in the United States are markedly over-represented among gay/bisexual young men (GBYM), especially those who are African American and Latino. The degree to which minority stress may explain racial disparities in HIV incidence is understudied in GBYM. This qualitative study examined racial/ethnic-minority and sexual-minority stress and their perceived influence on HIV infection in a sample of GBYM living with HIV. Findings indicated that racial/ethnic-minority stress more often emerged during sexual interactions, while sexual-minority stress was often family-based. Our discussion offers recommendations for primary HIV prevention efforts for GBYM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-304
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Sexual Health
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

Keywords

  • HIV prevention
  • HIV-positive youth
  • adolescent sexuality
  • minority stress
  • qualitative studies
  • racism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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