YouTube and the Expanding Role of Videos in Dermatologic Surgery Education

Komal D. Koya, Kyle R. Bhatia, Jeffrey T.S. Hsu, Ashish C. Bhatia*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Video is an excellent medium for medical education, both for clinicians and for the public. YouTube has emerged as one of the largest sources of freely accessible content. It is our intent to provide a preliminary discussion of the growing role of videos in medical education, sources of this video content, and the format of surgical video content on YouTube. Additionally, we will highlight the limitations and pitfalls that clinicians and the public should be aware of when viewing online video content. Several sources of both patient- and clinician-directed videos are easily accessible from the Internet and DVDs today. Medical professionals, students, and patients now have mobiles and instantaneous access to a growing collection of video content. A brief list of online video sources to view and learn dermatologic surgical techniques is provided. Given the increasing ease of creating and posting high-quality video content, this list will continue to grow, providing dermatologic surgeons with an ever-increasing wealth of visual knowledge. Although YouTube is a dominant source of publicly accessible videos, clinicians and consumers should be aware of the source and intent of the video content before accepting the content. Although it is easy to post content on YouTube, it is difficult to verify sources and the credentials of the people posting the videos. Therefore, the viewer should filter content with a discerning eye, embracing the concept of caveat emptor-or buyer beware.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-167
Number of pages5
JournalSeminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

Keywords

  • Adjacent tissue transfer
  • Assimilation surgical knowledge
  • Dermatologic surgery
  • Dermatology residency
  • Fellowship training
  • Flaps
  • Grafts
  • Learning medical surgical procedures
  • Mohs
  • Online videos
  • Plastic reconstructive surgery
  • Procedural dermatology
  • Skin surgery
  • Surgery training
  • Surgical education
  • Suturing technique
  • Video
  • Virtual Derm Surgery
  • Visual instruction
  • YouTube

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

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